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Why Does My Dog Shed So Much?



First, let me answer a question with a question: Do you brush? Believe it or not, short fur needs to shed just like long hair. So, even if you have a "short-haired" dog like I do, (Examples include: Pitbulls, Boxers, Doberman Pinscers, French Bulldogs, etc.) you still need to brush. Once or twice a week should do, and more frequently, the longer the hair. If you're not brushing to remove the hair manually, then it will remove itself naturally.


Hypoallergenic dogs are a whole other topic. Because they produce less dander and don't shed, they must be shed manually and regularly. All the more reason to brush... you can't remove excess hair if you can't get through it. (And then there's that second part everyone forgets about: the comb.) But this isn't a Doodle post about brushing. Just keep reading to find the right brush for you.


Back to your question: As previously stated, shedding is a natural and unavoidable part of pet ownership. According to WebMD, "The amount of fur a dog sheds depends on the breed of dog, the time of year, and whether they have a single or double layer of fur."


4 Reasons Why Dogs Shed Their Fur

A dog’s fur helps control their body temperature and protects their skin against the sun and other environmental elements. When a dog’s hair stops growing, they will naturally lose it by shedding. The amount and frequency of shedding will depend on several factors, including:

  • A dog’s health condition

  • A dog’s breed

  • Season and environment

Although dogs naturally shed, hair loss can also be caused by stress or health issues. Here are a few of the most common causes of shedding in dogs and what you should look out for:

  1. Seasonal Shedding: What breed is your dog?

  2. Stress-Induced Shedding: Has your environment become stressful?

  3. Skin Issues: Have you noticed flaky skin, itching, rashes, or acne?

  4. Allergies: Have you discussed the possibility with a vet?


So How Can I Manage My Dog’s Shedding?

While you can’t stop shedding in any dog, there are steps you can take to make it manageable:


  1. Brush your dog's' coat. Find the right brush HERE.

  2. Use a shedding tool, if necessary.

  3. Feed your dog a healthy diet.

  4. Make sure your dog is hydrated.

  5. Bathe your dog regularly.




Make it Fun!


Taking the time to brush and bathe your pup can be fun and gives you time to bond. However, if you're busy, having a regular groomer can also foster a relationship with your pup that can be just as beneficial and rewarding. Grooming provides a great opportunity to check your dog for new bumps, parasites, or dry skin. The result of grooming is a happy, healthy dog — and less shedding. At Furever Family, I understand the daily constraints of juggling work, faith, fitness, family, (a business, in my case,) and a social life. I would love to make your pup's plain ol' bath a special occasion. Heck, you can even add nail painting. Or upgrade to a Full Groom and get a full haircut and a Mahomes Cut!




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